Posts Tagged With: Facebook

The top four: time to pick favorites.

Let’s start off with Rachel’s reaction to blogs and their freedom of speech:

She addresses the different types of blog posts as well as the strong stereotypes that accompany them. I completely agree with her here:

In some situations people may have taken their “freedom of speech” a little too far.

I think this is a huge issue with the internet, especially with this “BSU Confessions” fad hitting Facebook. For right now, the negativity is minimal however, once it turns into a Burn Book it’ll lose its credibility. The same goes for anyone anywhere. Another reason why I feel Rachel did a good job covering this topic. You see, it’s not just where blogging is going popularity-wise but also how people are going to incorporate it into their day to day lives. Will this be a negative or a positive? We can only wait and see.

Next we have Jack’s Tiki-Toki timeline of the future:

I really loved how he incorporated Axel Bruns at the very end and how we will write a new book. Very clever. Also, I thought it was very interesting how freelance blogging from home. More and more people are declaring they’re self-employed so I think this is a real possibility. One of the creepiest ideas to me was the YouTube bit about identifying everyday citizens from their videos. I picture the Facebook face finder but for videos… chills. Apparently I’m a little behind because I had no idea what Twitter Bootstrap was so I had to Google it. Hmm, learn something new everyday.

Third on the list would be Joe’s interesting link-jobs in his digital artifact:

I was never familiar with the phrase “digital goldfish” so that was something new I learned. There is also the point of the evolution of technology and how blogging is so closely linked with technological innovations. As long as blogging continues to evolve to suit the online tools of the times, it’s here to stay.

Fourthly we have Matt’s timeline, also on Tiki-Toki:

Unlike Jack’s approach, where Google began filtering out the blogs with shorter posts, Matt looked at the future as Facebook turns blogging obsolete with its longer posts. The government getting involved was definitely a radical approach but, hey, it’s the future! Who knows? Maybe the next big thing will be the internet Civil Rights movement. And the part about the freelance writers turning to blogging, I can totally see that happening and its kind of scary.

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What’s next for blogging: I try to predict the future.

In The Beginning: [1980]

THERE WAS USENET! What’s that? Well, basically some guys made a world wide discussion board.

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Then we can journey through 1994-2001:

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In addition to just an “online diary,” blogs introduced entirely new tools only available through the web: permalinks, blogrolls, and trackbacks.

Then comes the politics: [2001-2004]

Now people can give live/public commentary on their favorite political happenings!

Keying up to the present: [2004-now]

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WHAT DO WE DO NOW?! WHAT’S NEXT?!

Certain questions will be answered: what makes “the perfect” blog?

Blogging will become a way to portray your personality. If you seem to be a generally likable person in your posts, more people will support you.

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Instead of petty judgments being thrown out face-to-face in direct confrontations, they will be thrown out blog-to-blog.

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Everything will be considered an experiment.

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Soon, all forms of communication will be done through the blogosphere. Instead of langage barriers, there will be coding errors. “HTML” will be used in everyday web conversation. People will be more afraid of the network crashing than the market crashing. Even worse, hashtags will be everywhere. #SpringBreak2003

Or…

Blogging will fade away like the tamagotchi you never fed.

*All information from sections In The Beginning through Keying up to the present (a.k.a. the historical sections) came from here. Thank you Wikipedia! This is why I give you money every once in a while.

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The Tag project.

When many people think back to high school fond memories usually aren’t the first things that come to mind. This is where I’m thankful. You see, for some reason my grade in high school consisted of just a ton of really awesome people. My specific group of awesome people consisted of about 30-80 people at any given time. Parties were fantastic. For some reason, unlike any other conglomeration of hormonal teenagers, we didn’t “clique” up. We had the varsity football players, the green team founders, the theatre kids, the band kids, the orchestra kids, the we-don’t-do-anything kids, the smartest people in the school, the dumbest people in the school, the alcoholics, the longboarders, the Magic maniacs, the C.O.D. guys and the religious bunch that weren’t allowed to read Harry Potter. We were The Breakfast Club on steroids; we had a little bit of everyone. And we only had one rule: be yourself. If you were anything else, we would know; I don’t how but we knew. If that makes us a clique then so be it. I still do not know how we all got along, but we did.

After high school it was like the breaking of the fellowship. We all spread out across the country and I lost touch with quite a few people. Yeah, it sucks but people move on with their lives. If I see you again, great! If not, oh well, it was nice knowing you! Then my friend Walker created a page appropriately titled “Keeping in Touch.” Ever since the creation of that I’ve felt that we’ve been able to at least keep some ties intact.

Recently, there was an article posted about a group of four guys who had been playing the game of “Tag” for 23 years. 23 YEARS. Yeah, talk about commitment.

The game they play is fundamentally the same as the schoolyard version: One player is “It” until he tags someone else. But men in their 40s can’t easily chase each other around the playground, at least not without making people nervous, so this tag has a twist. There are no geographic restrictions and the game is live for the entire month of February. The last guy tagged stays “It” for the year.

How did they manage this? Well, by flying across the country and hiding in one another’s car trunks, breaking and entering, steaking out in bushes, whatever they had to do to get their tag. Although the four men have all gone their separate ways, some to priesthood, some to criminal law practices, this game has allowed their friendship to stay strong throughout the years.

Mr. Konesky, a tech-company manager, is now “It” again and has had 11 months to stew. With February approaching, he has been batting around a few plans of attack. He says he likes to go after people who haven’t been “It” for a while. That includes Father Raftis, who has been harder to reach since he moved to Montana but who, as several players pointed out, is a sitting duck on Sundays.

Well, my friends and I also have no desire to lose each other so we decided to come up with our own version. There are seven of us, all at our respected universities: Alec, Alex, Walker, Kristi, Taylor, Joseph, and me. Organized through Facebook, we tried the whole “NOT IT” approach to see who would be “It” first. I had no desire to be”it” first so I changed the rules a bit and introduced the “nose goes” approach. If you’re not familiar with “nose goes” the rules are simple: don’t be the last person to put your finger on your nose otherwise you’re it. If you want some advice, the key to never losing is to start the process. 

So I switched it up. I posted a picture of me with my finger on my nose and my idea actually caught on. I love these guys.

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Joseph was the last one to participate thus he didn’t make it on to the collage. Out of everyone, though, he probably has the best placement to start us off. Taylor and I mapped it out so we know. Kristi is probably the safest over in Boston whereas Walker should watch his back. These guys are the kind of people who are not above driving ten hours and hiding in your closet, bribing people to achieve victory or ambushing you in the shower. They’re horrible and I love them dearly.

We begin in March.

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Pedagogical Pedagogy I

Blogging to Basics: How Blogs Are Bringing Online Education Back From The Brink

So, first thing’s first: online education is not doing so hot. Why? Well, because the way it is performed lacks efficiency. I can see why. In the online learning world there s no communication. There is no face-to-face discussion of the topics at hand. If you’ve never taken an online class before compare it to the “talking head” professor who sits at the front of the classroom or lecture and, well, lectures. Don’t get me wrong, I take the best notes when there is a lecture; however when that professor is using the same pencil-on-paper notes she’s been using since the 1980s, there’s something wrong there.

Authentic thinking, thinking that is concerned about reality, does not take place in ivory tower isolation, but only in communication. (Freire 1970)

How do you get a bunch of adults into the same virtual space and communicating? The discussion board formed the type of educational interaction online classes needed.

Yes, there are pitfalls to this gilded plan. First of all, when you ask a question you’d prefer an immediate answer, right? With discussion boards, sometimes there is no one even there to answer you so you’re forced to wait…and wait… and wait… until finally someone else in your class or your professor checks the page to see if anyone was trying to cry for help. If anyone cares enough to, so to speak. I mean if you post a question of a response and it doesn’t get at least one hit within a day or two even you start to lose interest. If after two days or so someone finally interact with your comment, you may take a few days to respond to that and thus your “conversation” is dictated over an entire week (meaning a perfectly efficient waste of your time).

Secondly,  there is a distinct lack of social presence as well thus the digital signature came to be. For instance, in my middle school days (seventh to ninth grade) I thought it was perfectly acceptable to end every Facebook status update with “:DD”. Oh, how wrong I was but hey, it was something, like a crude trademark of sorts.

Gilly Salmon would agree with me.

The saddest part about all of this is that discussion boards are the best the online learning community can throw out there: e-mail is bad for reference and wikis have little to no communication involved. Discussion boards give the best of both worlds although they tend to make the focus more on the space in which the group of individuals are learning rather than the individuals themselves.

BOOM. THEN COMES BLOG INTERVENTION.

Blogs redirect the educational focus back to the individual. Courses like this Weblogs and Wikis class create an atmosphere where the creative and the logical balance one another out. Normally I’d ignore any reference to MySpace.com however the book has a point. Myspace provided that creative outlet of ideas as well as that sense of virtual identity. With customizable backgrounds as well as unlimited sparkly images of Disney princesses, any person could take their hobbies and smear them all over their very own internet page! It was fantastic until people got st00pid and changed MySpace into a teenager abduction site.

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