Posts Tagged With: Learning

The Sunday Post (Part whatever week number we’re on)

So this week was interesting to say the least. Monday started me off blogging about something I cared about. Some friends and I started a tag project so that was pretty neat, if I must say so myself. It wasn’t a required task but I actually blogged for me and not a grade this time. It was a breath of fresh air. I tried to incorporate some of the things I’ve been learning in the class: embedding images, linking to sources, quoting outside articles, considering everything an experiment waiting to happen. Strangers really seemed to like it.

Then we got our book assignments to read through chapters 11-14 and type up a few posts. I made my first post how I would take lecture notes. I went through the text making comments here and there and highlighting important quotes i would find helpful later one. In then typed it all up in my own words. That was on chapter 11. Chapters 12 and 13 didn’t really trigger any responses from me. However, after reading chapter 14, something snapped. I’m a raging feminist at heart (maybe it’s because I have ovaries) as well as hater of those who feel dealing out judgement is entertaining. Call me a hypocrite if you want. That chapter gave me my idea for this week’s digital artifact which I worked on with Joe and Matt. Instead of making one giant post, we all found parts of chapter fourteen that interested us and then elaborated in our own ways. I touched on sexism and the blogging bourgeoisie that find it their duty to patrol our pingbacks. I talk about manhandling. You should read it.

Joe’s post was about pseudonyms. Did you know that J.K. Rowling specifically chose to have her name initialed to make her name more gender neutral? What twelve year-old boy is going to pick up a book by a Joanne Rowling?

Matt addressed the issue of ageism, however it wasn’t from the end of a young person but from the older generations. Interesting stuff. Make sure you check it out!

Also, check out this awesome work of online literature. It does a fantastic job of taking into consideration the future of blogging as well as the day to day worries of the prepubescent  learner or, in this case, lurker.

Next week is supposed to mark a change in pace so it will be interesting to see just which direction this class goes. I’ve learned how to keep up in my own way and now it’s going to mixed up all over again.

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Chugging out the Sunday post.

It seems as if it was only a week ago I was doing this exact same thing. Alas it is Sunday and alas, I care about my grade so I am back to reiterate everything I’ve done in the past seven days. Well, Monday found me partially dying from The Oak Hall Plague: Second Semester Sickness. It was great. I slept, drank tea, and chewed down DayQuil like it was a chocolate chip cookie (as in one cookie every four to six hours). I took the day off.

Tuesday I felt a wee bit better. I was still wearing the same sweatshirt and sweatpants combo from the day before but I could move and actually make decisions and think somewhat clearly once the drugs kicked in. I read through chapters nine and ten in Uses of Blogs. To this day I have no idea how I got past the few couple of lines from chapter ten.  I believe Jean Burgess did not mean anyone to understand what she was saying for the first page or so. Maybe my mind was muddled a bit, too. Who knows? The word “pedagogy” was thrown around so many times between the two chapters I started underlining it. Sentence two of Blogging to Learn, Learning to Blog:

Their emergence in Internet culture has synchronized to a large extent with trends in pedagogy toward user-centered, participatory learning in combination with the technologization of the curriculum. (105)

Can I get a translater over here?

Alright, alright. I’ll stop with the criticism. I guess I’ll start talking about what I actually learned from these couple of chapters. We’ll start with the fact that I now know exactly where Morgan got quite a bit of his ideas. The issue with commenting and discussion boards is addressed because in order to get a decent grade in the class we were forced to be checking to see if someone had commented on our posts as well as forcing us to comment on the posts of others. Soon these “assignments” became habitual for me and WordPress was the second thing I checked when opening my web browser today. It is almost sad how sucked in I can get when it comes to social networking. Who knows? Next, I might actually appreciate Twitter in all its grandeur. Or not. I hope not. God, I hope not.

Somethings that were brought up in the chapters I found rather interesting would be the genre of “research” blogging and how similar that is to what we’re doing and how I’m still trying to fit in that little bit of me that wants to be creative and go off on tangents like this one. You know, if it was up to me, I would make a blog entirely about bad math jokes. I mean “bad” as in “poorly designed and nobody will laugh” not “bad” as in “these are dirty, do not share at church.” All of my jokes will be church approved.

Back to the subject at hand: Class. But we’re not supposed to think of it as a class? But we hav assignments? I don’t know. I’m just trying to chug along at my own pace and see how it goes, that’s how I got through my Nordic skiing years and those seemed to work out more or less in my favor.

Posts for this week

Enjoy, you blogging lunatics.

A gift for your efforts.

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Pedagogical Pedagogy II

Blogging to Learn, Learning to Blog

Blogs being used in the learning environment? That sounds familiar. I think instead of all of us using one type of blog, I almost think it would be even more interesting to assign each person to go out and find their own type of blog site as well as their own blogging genre to do. If you want us to have a virtual identity, then I think that would be the perfect way to do it (if you don’t then forgot I said anything).

At the same time, I can see why we started with WordPress: it’s easy to use, easy to learn on, easy to connect with one another, and easy to adapt. For us, as students, to improve our creative and network literacy we need to begin with the basics. Certain expectations certainly took me by surprise and this is coming from someone who has dabbled around with blogging quite a bit. I wasn’t expecting this class to be a cake-walk but I felt I could handle whatever was thrown at me.

Something I also like about us starting with WordPress is the fact that, although we’re learning the basics, there are things here that I’m sure plenty of people (like me) just do not understand. Like embedding videos? Yeah, for some reason it took me a couple of days to figure out. However, I’m glad I’m not like a couple of students mentioned in the book.

There was often an implicit assumption by students that the technologies they use for formal learning should be stable, easy to use, and transparent, and not open, configurable, or complex. (107)

For some reason, after reading that portion of the text all I could think about was the Jumpstart series. If you want to watch a video, be prepared for nine minutes of nostalgia and vulgarity.

Your cursor is the size of a house! Don’t get me wrong, I love and will always love Jumpstart but after reading this chapter I can see why so many people might expect something like that. We grow up with things spelled out for us. Sure, we aren’t all born coders but there is nothing wrong with incorporating those aspects into our everyday school system.

On top of that I found the sentence that describes this course to a “T”.

In the context of educational– more specifically, “research”– blogging existing speech genres (conversation, debate, personal storytelling) need to be articulated with ossified academic writing genres (the essay, the research report, the literature review, the critique). (108)

That is what I have saying all along! My creative side and my intellectual side have to go to marriage counseling or something to work out these problems creating such rifts between them. Regardless, I still have a lot of work to do.

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