Posts Tagged With: research

What my pink highlighter taught me.

Chapter Eleven

Scholarly Blogging: Moving toward the Visible College

Blogging boils down to three major settings: the notebook, the coffee house, and the editorial page. The phrases themselves are rather self-explanatory; however there is one more type that seems to be a hybrid division: the scholarly blog.

A decade ago Harrison and Stephen explained why computer networking was of such interest to academics. It played to long-held ideals among scholars that had yet to be realized: “unending and inclusive scholarly conversation; collaborative inquiry limited only by mutual interests; unrestrained access to scholarly resources; independent, decentralized learning; and a timely and universally accessible system for representing, distributing, and archiving knowledge.” (118)

Scholarly blogs provide most, if not all, of these opportunities. If anything they follow the four major themes of blogging practices:

  • They rely on networked audiences.
  • They encourage conversation between readers.
  • They are generally a low-intensity activity.
  • Depending on the blog, they can portray a transparent thinking-in-process style.

Let’s talk about the three bog settings, first being “The Notebook.” Like any other diary of sorts, this type of blog allows you to jot down any ideas, quotes, dreams, ice cream flavors, or whatever else suits your fancy. It’s a way of thinking out loud without really verbalizing anything (Unless you’re like me, where you type and talk at the same time). Taken to a more professional level:

The notebooks of many scholars, from Faraday to da Vinci to Gramsci to Darwin, have opened up new realms to later researchers. While the use of such a notebook differs from field to field, in sciences  it might be argued that the ab notebook represents a clear expression of everything the scientist does. (119)

As Cory Doctorow put it, the notebook blog is like his “outboard brain.” Through links he is able to draw lines to relevancy thus making his simple lecture notes even more interesting and interactive.

Nest, we have “The Coffee House.” Although not very common in the large-scale blogosphere, The Coffee House community can still be traced through the hyperlinks recorded back and forth between them.

Many have suggested that blogging in the modern recapitulation of pamphleteering, but like blogs, the coffee houe thrived on mixing and exchanging the opinions and ideas of those from a variety of backgrounds. Like blogs, however, those with particular interests or political leanings were likely to flock to the same coffeehouse. (120)

Like interests are attracted to like interests. Hmm, seems legit.

Lastly, we have “The Opinions Page,” which, like any other Op. Ed. page in a newspaper, represents an opinion not necessarily expressed by a journalist. It represents information provided by those who wish to educate the public and “engage in public issues.” Scholarly blogging finds its foothold here. Blogs provide a forum where those communication barriers aren’t so prominent.

However, some scholars are finding it tough to distinguish work versus play, what’s personal versus what’s professional, what is appropriate versus what is way too much information.

In the end, though blogging is here to stay. At least, for a little while. It provides that bit of communication other forums may be lacking.

Exhausted Devan commentary.

Exhausted Devan commentary.

Advertisements
Categories: #en3177 | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Uses of Blogs turned inside out.

Today I spent a little time reading the fine print of our class book, Uses of Blogs by Axel Bruns and Joanne Jacobs. As I started reading through the table of contents I noticed that each section wasn’t done by Bruns and Jacobs, but by a collection of individuals. I probably should have noticed this before. Ah well. We were advised to do a little digging on our authors, to see where they come from and if their input is worth taking to heart. I would read the back of my book where there are condensed biographies of the two but there is currently a giant “Used Books” sticker placed right over their job descriptions.

Image

Axel Bruns

An associate professor at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, Bruns came up with the term “produsage” to describe the user-led collection of internet creation happening today. He has written and co-edited several books about User-Information relationships as well as a co-founder of the academic publisher called M/C.

Joanne Jacobs

Jacobs was also an associate professor at Queensland University of Technology. She lectured about e-commerce and was the go-to woman for issues dealing with technology assessment. She was also an expert in telecommunications and media studies. Feel free to follow her on Twitter here. To be honest, although she may be a COO, she seems like a pretty regular person.

One other contributor, Jane B. Singer, has also sparked my interest. She mentions links several times throughout her chapter.

News bloggers ar transparent not only in their motive but also in their process, extensively using links to documents, sources, new articles, and other sorts of evidence to buttress their points and establish their authority. (Uses of Blogs, 28)

I sent her an e-mail asking a few questions to clear thing up for me. I want to know how links establish legitimacy and how they’ve become essential to the success of blogs and internet resources everywhere. Why can’t people simply believe anymore in the validity of information?

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: #en3177 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.

Oh Heil Yeah

Weblogs, wikis, and other things beginning with W

Talk Nerdy To Me

An exploration of ideas and projects curated by a Computer Engineering student.

Silentc0re.com

The Home for Everything Silentc0re

TwistedSifter

The Best of the visual Web, sifted, sorted and summarized

Picks and Blocks

Floating Trees!

Playing Your Hand Right

Showing America how to Live

English Language Journal

Thoughts on the glories of the English language.

malmsy.net

An introvert's foray into social media.

BSU Blog Sauce

Not just another WordPress blog #en3177

Weblog at Gunpoint

Under Duress from an American British American English Professor

Memegwesi

SF&F Aspirations, Reviews, Silliness.

Brina Likes Books

And some other stuff, too.

Literacy Reviews and Cre8here

"Most things you worry about, never happen"

Bird Song

Just another WordPress.com site

In An Ocean of Noise

This blog was created to post my articles, published or unpublished, written for the Student Voice at UW-River Falls.

Weblogs and Wikis Daybook

a blog for past, current, and future participants of Weblogs and Wikis

Jesse James and the Internet

Perspective from a boy in a bubble.

To Write Or Not To Write

The confused, rambling and sometime incomprehensible ravings of a wanna be author...or poet...or ninja

Banjos in Backseats

Just folking around.

%d bloggers like this: